CELEBRATING A GREAT SOUL: MAHATMA GANDHI

September 30, 2017

MOHANDAS KARAMCHAND GANDHI WAS BORN  IN PORBANDER, INDIA, ON OCTOBER 2, 1869. ASSASSINATED IN INDIA ON JANUARY 30, 1948.

GANDHI 005 JPEG.png

 

 http://www.gujarattourism.com/destination/details/7/273

 

GANGHI 002JPEG

Porbandar was controlled by the Jethwa Rajputs from about the 16th century. It was the capital of the former princely state of Porbandar (1785–1948) before it was incorporated into independent India. Nationalist leader Mohandas K. Gandhi was born in Porbandar in 1869, and both his birthplace and the neighbouring Kirti Mandir, a museum dedicated to Gandhi, are major tourist destinations.

Ref: https://www.britannica.com/place/Porbandar

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STUDENT GANDHI

Gandhi Ji with 2nd Queen Elizabeth in a Dance PartyJPEG

GANDHI DANCING WITH THE QUEEN OF ENGLAND

THE RELEVANCE OF GANDHI- WHY GANDHI STILL MATTERS

http://www.mkgandhi.org/articles/relevance_of_gandhi.htm

 

POEMS ON MAHATMA GANDHI (THE GREAT SOUL)

By Leonard Dabydeen

 

Namaste, Gandhiji

Footprints on the sands of time glow with birthmark each glittering step unshaken and challenging not by yielding to temptation but thirst for truth for the awakening of men for soul-searching in glimpses of the Transvaal for monsoon moments in vestibules of maharajas turnstiles in South Africa under a mango tree in India ricocheting in global rumbles for peace and non-violence and as the wind whispers in a stormy weather where wars create bedrocks for sleepless journeys I clasp my hands in solemn gesture as if it were the beginning of the end namaste, Gandhiji

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/namaste-gandhiji/

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/mahatma-gandhi-leonard-dabydeen

 

Gandhiji, Namaste

I shouted when I heard the shot rang out his frail hands in solemn prayer, hey Ram. Today I mark his final ‘Namaste’ satyagraha no more fight ending war.

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/gandhiji-namaste/

http://poemllst.com/?mode=poem&id=364654

Let Us Narrate A Prayer

(Sleep)

I find it difficult to decipher What trust I should lay Upon my feathered pillow, Just before day closes Its winded shutters To night’s rhapsody Of melodious sounds. Night heralds the end Of a beautiful sunlight day’s orange gleam With twilight hues – So much kaleidoscopic radiance! And silently spread Wings of cool, caressing ambiance To let sheep gather For a night’s prayer, To let the cows moo Before repose for one last fodder of hay, While chickens take their spot On racks in a coop, And horses are blessed with one last visit From their patron stable ranger. So when I attempt To choreograph my thoughts In a ballet stance Like a ballerina in full ecstasy And close my eyes to sleep, I pray for a dream Of sweet endearment That our world will no longer Make more wars to fret each nation. Rather as Gandhi would acclaim We must seek peace and purity of mind: So join me to nurture this sleep For a peaceful and progressive world., Let us narrate a prayer.

 

http://poemllst.com/?mode=poem&id=364691

 

(Author: Leonard Dabydeen: Searching For You, A Collection of Tetractys and Fibonacci Poems, Xlibris Publications, 2015)

 

# 88

Each Man’s Struggle

 

There

always

will be hope

like calcined dreams

each man’s struggle is another man’s hope.

 

# 89

Fight Your Way

 

Fight

your way

to freedom

like Gandhiji

make no prison walls block your hopes and dreams.

 

 

 

AN EYE FOR AN EYE MAKES THE WHOLE WORLD BLIND…

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-dear/an-eye-for-an-eye-makes-t_b_8647348.html

Our topic was “Living Nonviolence, with Jesus, Gandhi and King.” I had been planning it for months. Many of us around the world believe with Mahatma Gandhi and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., that nonviolence is the world’s only hope, the world’s only solution to insane violence, the world’s best pathway toward peace. As we heard the news from Paris, we turned again to the ancient teachings of nonviolence, and spent the weekend trying to deepen our own nonviolence so we could do our part to hasten a more nonviolent world.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-rUsdhwRqc

 

 

MY BOOK REVIEW: MOHANDAS K. GANDHI, Thoughts, Words, Deeds …

 

https://ldabydeen.wordpress.com/2012/06/

 

Gandhiji, Namaste

I shouted when I heard the shot rang out his frail hands in solemn prayer, hey Ram. Today I mark his final ‘Namaste’ satyagraha no more fight ending war.

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/gandhiji-namaste/

http://poemllst.com/?mode=poem&id=364654 

 

 

http://poemllst.com/?mode=poem&id=364691

 

(Author: Leonard Dabydeen: Searching For You, A Collection of Tetractys and Fibonacci Poems, Xlibris Publications, 2015)

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-dear/an-eye-for-an-eye-makes-t_b_8647348.html

 

 

 

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THE SOCIETY OF CLASSICAL POETS

September 26, 2017

A BIRTHDAY PRESENTATION FOR WILLIAM F.E. MORLEY

http://classicalpoets.org/book-review-groans-from-old-bones-by-william-f-e-morley-1920/

 

JUST OLD BONES

September 9, 2017

Just Old Bones

By Leonard Dabydeen -July 14 2016

[For William F.E. Morley – 1920 – present]

Wm F.E. Morley JPEG

Author: GROANS FROM OLD BONES (2016)

A notch short of Byron

so amusing

entertaining to the core:

mind, body, and soul

walking you through archives and enclaves

jotting a memory here, there, everywhere

his amusement lingers

like perfume fragrances

in the botany of life

you desire to sit with him

watch him prancing

laugh a little from the heart

like Richardson’s Tecumseh

watch him bow a little

craving thoughts how to rhyme

uncaring about fetter of time

hear a little groan

a sombre tone

a witty smile

age matters for a while

ecstatic his life be known

deep in his old bone.

 

 

BOOK: GROANS FROM OLD BONES by William F.E. Morley

September 9, 2017

*Click to read this book

BOOK GROANS FROM OLD BONES 001 PDF JPEG

 

BOOK GROANS FROM OLD BONES PNGWm F.E. Morley JPEG

Author: William F.E. Morley

BOOK: SEARCHING FOR YOU, A Collection of Tetractys & Fibonacci Poems

August 30, 2017

BOOK COVER SEARCHING FOR YOU JPEGLeonard Dabydeen005JPEG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Click on this PDF to read the book.

SEARCHING FOR YOU 9781514409749 E BOOK PDF

 

https://guyaneseonline.wordpress.com/2015/11/15/book-searching-for-you-a-collection-of-tetractys-fibonacci-poems-by-leonard-Dabydeen/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 29, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOOK REVIEW: To Whom I Return Each Day – Leonard Dabydeen

August 16, 2017

To Whom I Return Each Day JPEGBOOK: To Whom I Return Each Day

Author:  Jaydeep Sarangi

Publisher:   Cyberwit.net (11 April, 2017)  

Pages (Paperback) : 75 pages

ISBN   10 8182533988

ISBN   13 978818253398

 

Paperback: $15.00

Book Review: Leonard Dabydeen

Poetry is like a bird, it ignores all frontiers. – Yevgeny Yevtushenko

 REVIEW:

This book, To Whom I Return Each Day by author Jaydeep Sarangi is an olio of forty-two poems packaged beautifully in a bundle of 75 pages. For some of us, it may be blasé to say, “All Good Things Come in Small Packages”, but to peruse poems in this book, To Whom I Return Each Day, will rivet your mind and keep you spellbound with deep-seated soul searching – in a world we continually observe in ways that are good, bad and very often indifferent. John Thieme, a Faculty Member and Professor of East Anglia School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing in the United Kingdom, with specialty in postcolonial and colonial writings, vehemently comments (see back cover of the book) that,

“Jaydeep Sarangi’s poems are moving testaments to parallel lives lived on either side of walls. Personal and political, they summon up the evanescent beauty and small moments with a quiet reflectiveness that speaks volumes.”

This “sari of poetry” as author Jaydeep endearingly describes his book, To Whom I Return Each Day, spans a period of a year in nurturing, during his sojourn in varied places he nostalgically called home away from home in Kolkata, India. With an ebullient poise and mindful jubilation, he writes in the Preface, “I wear it [sari of poetry] in different kinds. My familiarity with many poets of the world is the chief stream of my joys and happiness. It’s very unique in order and disposition. It is flowing in my veins.” And in the same sustaining oceanic depth of gratification, he sighs in continuance …”Now, I’m anchored in Kolkata, a city of rich cultural roots. I attend poetry readings and get the most of these gatherings of poets; young and old. … I ride with this rare legacy of languages and cultural plurality in my back.” And within this ambulatory cornucopia of poems, author Jaydeep presents us with this elegant platter, To Whom I Return Each Day.

More so, Jaydeep’s eclectic poetic journey is analogous to the thought process of the lead character, Percy Fawcett in the movie, The Lost City of Z, when he was cautioned by the Fortune Teller that, “What you see is far greater than you ever imagined.” And underscoring his [Percy Fawcett] mind-set, his wife Nina Fawcett said to him, “To dream is to seek the unknown. To look for what is beautiful is its own reward. A man’s reach should exceed his grasp, what’s a heaven for?”

http://www.moviequotesandmore.com/the-lost-city-of-z-new-trailer/

And so, too, in absolute defence of poetry, Percy Bysshe Shelley (1821) said, “Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.” In approbation, also, William Wordsworth quipped, “Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.”

http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/poets_on_poetry.htm

This book, To Whom I Return Each Day is specially dedicated to late Nobel laureate, poet and playwright Derek Walcott, who passed away on March 17, 2017. It was published on April 11, 2017, and author Jaydeep Sarangi unequivocally sculpted Walcott’s name in the book, in dedication as a symbolic gesture of Walcott’s prodigious literary inflected experiences on the international poetry platform. Walcott’s poetic oeuvre, inclusive of his Nobel prize (1992) and the T.S. Eliot prize for The White Egrets (2011) among a constellation of literary awards, most likely served as an ecstatic paean to weigh triumphantly on Jaydeep’s own work. Without much pause for comfort, he continues his poetic navigation in the sea of thoughts, as in the words of New Yorker’s Hilton Als (reflecting on the death of Derek Walcott),

The sea, memory, the joys and terrors of physical love, the close distance of family, black market women surrounded by all sorts of color, palm trees, the lush funky earth known as home or elsewhere: these were his subjects.

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/derek-walcott-a-mighty-poet-has-died

And this is how we come to pan the pages of Jaydeep’s To Whom I Return Each Day. Let us take a look at the first poem, The City of Nine Gates (p 11),

Fire is surrounded by smoke,

Deep water by its banks

 

Every action, every work, small and big

Is surrounded by defects.

 

Our feet are in mud, doors half open,

Eyes are half closed. Always cover up

Stories for others. Write new lines

If poetry gives Hope. Poems set us free

From bonds of actions.

 

Whatever happens began in the past before the rain.

Moments swing between minds,

Moods and gates at several planes.

 

Each small moment is brighten up-

nava-dwara-pura, the City of Nine Gates.

We steer our ships in deep water. We are

Out for isles nowhere, for trials of our soul.

 

Simple, lucid and powerful versification in this poem, The City of Nine Gates, in order to visit this garland of poetry, To Whom I Return Each Day. In Vedanta philosophy and according to the Shrimad Bhagavad Gita, Part 76, Chapter 5,

Lord Krishna uses this metaphor of the city of nine gates. … . By saying that the self realized man   living   within this physical frame   is ever watching over the activities of the matter equipment   around him. He is a mere witness   and so neither rejoices nor   is he sad ,   neither acts nor   causes others to act, while living in this city of nine gates.

http://www.vedantaindailylife.com/2012/08/the-city-of-nine-gates.html

And Jaydeep vehemently espoused that this mind/body consciousness, within the parameters and perambulations of the city of nine gates, can be realised through poetry. In his opening paragraph of the PREFACE in this book, he writes “Poetry bears a flag for peace and hope. They are prayers. Poems are for peace and order in human life.” 

In this poem, My Mother (p. 14), Jaydeep writes (last three stanzas),

Your red soil gave fruits. I touched the cords

It became a full song.

As wagons of life matters move towards the eternal,

A quite fall under the Neem tree, pure air.

I’m healed. I hold origin of life.

Here the author refers to Mother Earth and the spiritual connection of man to ”Mother”. An esoteric touch.

In the title poem, To Whom I Return Each Day (p. 15), Jaydeep dwells on the emotional gateway of the human psyche. He writes in the opening stanza,

 

My father, when I as a tiny boy, asked me

To have something to whom I can return each day.

I carry the frontier advice in my small chamber

Where boundaries shift, links delinked.

Mind is guru, at times, restless pointer

Useless as weapons after the war. I return in the night,

After the rain. Woods are fresh and green.

And in stanza 3, Jaydeep speaks to his ‘Dulung’ – the river that courses through the mystic Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, thus,

My Dulung has a natural course

My forefathers lay bare on its banks.

They have a happy abode, somewhere beyond these words.

Priest chants, santi santi santi.

Peace in the land is the rose that blooms

Every season. Every house is wet by love.

And in the last stanza (p.17), the author brings to us a blissful home-coming consciousness, without dwelling on his multitude of poetic wanderings, so resonant in similarity to Nobel Laureate (Literature) Derek Walcott’s love for home, thus,

I return to each small city

Where people are happy

Ethnic culture is their home

Where my mother sleeps. Eyes closed,

Hands folded. Morning prayers to the Sun God

Keep her healthy. Mind is free

For others to plant trees of brotherhood,

Of peace of the peninsula, home of hearts.

A common thread weaving through this panoply of poems in Jaydeep’s book is his intensity to harness peace, love, harmony and brotherhood among humanity. His conscious (and subconscious) stream of imagery is consummated in the poems by nature, or things natural in the environment. Let us take a read of the first stanza in this poem, Last Rites of My First Love (p.31),

When there are no stars in the sky

I count memory

I brood over present unhappiness

Blood sprinkle all my parts

My uneasy hands search for solid mass.

And in continuation in stanza 5 (first five lines, pp. 31-32) with a sacrosanct tone,

I walk anywhere to nowhere

I visit small rivers of the mind, plant my sapling

Wet green is my company

Leaves of these trees

Bear my survival. I live.

There appears to be a symbiosis among trees and the human spirit in many of Jaydeep’s poems. And the analogy of Derek Walcott’s love for nature is so evident. Take a read of Tree in Me (p.33),

Each one of us

Is having different weather.

And then in, I Go Green (p.34),

Wherever I go, my little brother’s voice,

I carry my green hopes.

And here on this, A Tree and My Daughter (p.44),

Do you hold history in your hands?

 

I give you words to paint your tree, dear,

The sapling you have. Colour it

In your mind. Plant it near the river you chose to live.

Give a name: My Green Tree. Watch it grow in you.

 

Here Jaydeep certainly takes me to Joyce Kilmer’s (1886-1918) poem, Trees,

I think that I shall never see  

A poem lovely as a tree.  

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/12744/trees

But not all the poems are about greenery and trees. Some of the poems flow in confluence with a spiritual undercurrent to ignite a holistic nature on the reader. As in this poem, Nataraja (p.45),

Shiva, the cosmic unison, of life and death

Of all orders, near the perfume river …

And other poems flow in imagery and simplistic style with social nuances that have affects in the author’s life, as in A Dalit Poem (p.52),

Years back, you had to wait

Till I fetch water from a pond.

Your touch polluted my creamy skin

I coiled within. I framed rules for you.

Won elections with promises, bellyful.

And without much pause, the reader is obliged an open invitation to read this book of poems from beginning to end.

Jaydeep’s poetic sea of poems in this book, To Whom I Return Each Day, flows with a delightful wind-rush to the ocean of poetic joy. He visualises the poem as the magical elixir, empathetically remarking [in the PREFACE): “I’ve witnessed life in different shades; castes, creed and religions in India and overseas.” And continuing his brooding note, saying: “The candle of poems burns slowly, very slowly. I watch them burn in me. Poem build up a ladder to the heaven in mind. I try to explore what’s there between two ultimate pages: life and death.”

Jaydeep Sarangi was born on 11 December, 1973 in the town of Jhagram in West Bengal. He grew up with Muse in his childhood upbringing, writing poetry at a very young age. According to Indian English poet, Sahitya Gourav, writing in the Boloji blog, Jaydeep Sarangi is a prolific bilingual writer, translator, interviewer, editor, critic and a highly acclaimed literary academic. His works and achievements are too numerous to mention in this review. Jaydeep Sarangi is the author of 30 books, to include poetry publications: From Dulong to Beas: Flow of the Soul (2012), Silent Day (2013), A Door – Somewhere? (2014), The Wall and Other Poems (2015), To Whom I Return Each Day (2017), Lall Palasher Renu – Bangla poetry collection (2017).

“Dr Sarangi’s poems ,articles and reviews have appeared in different refereed international journals and magazines in several countries.He has read poems on different shores and reviews on his works have appeared worlwide.He has guest edited three   issues for muse india on marginal literatures from the Eastern India and the North East and Derek Walcott.He has been invited as resource person/writer in several universities in India , Australia,Poland,Germany,Slovakia,Italy and USA.

Dr. Jaydeep Sarangi is Associate Professor, the Deptt. English , Jogesh Chandra Chaudhuri College (Calcutta University), 30,Prince Anwar Shah Road,Kolkata-700033,WB, India.”

(http://www.boloji.com/index.cfm?md=Content&sd=Writers&WriterID=2518)

 

Jaydeep Sarangi was also the volunteered guest Editor for Muse India e-Journal Issue 73: May-June 2017, on the works of Derek Walcott (1930-2017), Nobel Laureate (Literature) . This writer’s article: “Musings on Walcott’s Life and Work” was published in this journal.

http://www.museindia.com/viewarchive.asp?myr=2017&issid=73

http://www.museindia.com/viewarticle.asp?myr=2017&issid=73&id=7260

When I received Jaydeep Sarangi’s book, To Whom I Return Each Day by mail in May 2017, signed by the author, there was a note on the Dedication page (Book dedicated to Derek Alton Walcott (1930-2017): “Dear friend Leonard, We will be the rhythm and the tears and the blood of history.”

We will wait for the rain.

This book is available:

https://www.amazon.com/Whom-Return-Each-Day/dp/8182533988

http://www.bookbutler.com/search?isbn=8182533988

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poem: A Rich Man

July 29, 2017

Poem: A Rich Man by Leonard Dabydeen

 

A Rich Man

 

When a rich man is afraid

That he may lose everything

He sleeps less for not being paid

And twitters almost about anything.

 

God forbid time will come

When he and his cronies

Will wonder if they and some

Will squawk about their follies.

 

What shall we do next? They ask

Sitting on their laurels at last

Abracadabra what is our task?

Scrubbing hands to wash the past.

 

And this rich man will sit and ponder

What is it like being poor, I wonder?

 

 

 

Book Review: Hare Krishna

July 26, 2017

July 19, 2017

 

MAHATHI BK REV PNG

Author: Mahathi

Book: Hare Krishna

Publisher: Prowess Publishing, May 2, 2017

Pages (Print Length) Paperback 402 pages

ASIN B071VDC76Y

ISBN  978 161 813 284

Kindle Ed. ₹ 321

Paperback  ₹ 450

 

Book Review: Leonard Dabydeen

Bhagavad Gita Verse 7, Chapter 4

Whenever there is a decline in righteousness, and a rise in unrighteousness prevails, then do I manifest myself, O Bhaarata.

Bhagavad Gita Verse 7, Chapter 4

Mahathi’s 8th book, Hare Krishna is an empowering tour-de-force of the glorious and adventurous saga of Lord Krishna’s childhood in mellifluous versification, inked in prosody of bansuri-like narrative and lyrical ballads. The book is a trans-creation in English by Mahathi based on the immortal Hindu classical epic, Srimad Bhagavatham by luminous spiritual H.H.Sage Sri Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa (see back cover of the book). It is the arduous arrival from Mahahi’s 6th book, FINDING THE MOTHER, another trans-creation in English verse reflective of SRI SUNDARA  KANDA, H.H. Valmiki’s 5th Canto of SRIMAD RAMAYANA and well-recognised as an immortal classic of English Literature.

Author Mahathi’s prodigious Hare Krishna is staged as another English literary classic, prodding his literary esteem as “arguably one of the best English poets of the 21st century.” (see back cover of the book). It is set as ballads in iambic meter in 47 dramatic narrative and lyrical poems, with inclusive conundrums offering insightful explanations on critical religious topics related to Lord Krishna and Hinduism to flag 402 pages.

In order to appreciate, understand and absorb with relentless joy the childhood adventures of Lord Krishna as in this author’s book, Hare Krishna, it would be incumbent in body, mind and spiritual upliftment to quest for Lord Krishna. From Wikipedia, the free Encyclopedia,

“Krishna (/ˈkrɪʃnə/; Sanskrit: कृष्ण, Kṛṣṇa in IAST, pronounced [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] (About this sound listen)) is the god of compassion, tenderness, and love in Hinduism.[1][2] He is one of the most widely revered and popular Indian divinities, worshipped as the eighth incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu and also as the supreme God in his own right.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krishna

In his blog, ThoughtCo.com, Subhamoy Das explains,

“As one of the principal gods of Hinduism, Krishna represents mankind’s aspiration to embody all that is divine. Amorous and loyal, he is seen as the ideal husband, and his playful nature is a gentle admonition to remain good-natured in the face of life’s challenges.

As counsel to the warrior Arjuna, Krishna serves as a moral compass for the faithful. His exploits in the Bhagavad Gita and other holy scripture are ethical models of behavior for Hindus, particularly on the nature of personal choice and responsibility to others.”

https://www.thoughtco.com/the-story-of-the-birth-of-lord-krishna-1770453

According to IndiaNetzone, the illustrious and spiritually glorifying childhood of Lord Krishna, being enshrined in the Krishna charitas, with Krishna blessed as the eighth incarnation of God Vishnu, is a significant part of the Indian epic Mahabharata. In the first three paragraphs, under the title: Childhood of Lord Krishna, Indian Classical Tale, Mahabharata,

The mischief and miracles by Lord Krishna in his infant days are still revered and remembered by the Indians as the holy antics by the Vishnu avatara in Gokula with the Braj people.

After the birth of Lord Krishna, his father Vasudeva brought him to Gokula. He was brought up in the safe and secured supervision of mother Yashoda and Nand. The maternal uncle of Lord Krishna, King Kansa was destined to die in his hands and thus the king wanted to kill Krishna right from his birth. During his childhood, Krishna faced several perilous situations that were designed by the notorious Kansa, however no one could slay him for his unsurpassed divine power.

There were great rejoicings and celebration in Gokula after the Braj people came to know about the charming son of Nand and Yashoda. The astrologers predicted that this divine child would kill the demons and the evil, thus he should be called the Lord of the herds and the Gopis. King Kansa somehow came to know that his reason of death lived in Gokula and kept on sending demons to slay all the children of the place.

http://www.indianetzone.com/38/childhood_lord_krishna.htm

And within this eternal swirl of a magnificent worldly amphitheatre, author Mahathi garlanded Lord Krishna’s childhood saga in this book Hare Krishna, in euphonious narrative and lyrical ballads. In offering BLESSINGS to Mahathi, Jai Srimannarayana writes,

Touch His [Lord Krishna] story anywhere. It is sweet. Put it in poetry or prose, and it is sweet. Let anyone sing it or write it, and it is still sweet because the very nature of the Lord is sweet. (p v)

Mahathi’s unequivocal due diligence in the pursuit of writing Hare Krishna, based on the epic classic saga SRIMAD BHAGAVATHAM by H.H. Sage SRIKRISHNA DWAIPAYANA VYASA is sculpted from his undeterred belief that our fractured society and its social ills make us inhuman in a human world. This is Adharma. And only by following “Dharmic path alone can bring eternal peace and prosperity to the world.” (See back cover of the book).

In his own perambulating over this book, Hare Krishna, Mahathi informs us of his inner soul-searching, saying,

2 years of writing, 2 more years of waiting, strenuous research, a lot of prayers, a lot more of penance, pain, joy, tears and divine rhapsody; a little intuition, a shower of invisible benisons from THE MASTER and a never ending influx of blessings from family, friends, relatives and well-wishers…oh at last ready is HARE KRISHNA.

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/hare-krishna-about-my-latest-book/

In typical vintage poetic affluence garnished in fun, pun and satirical brush-strokes, Mahathi  reaches out to us with deep-throated emotions that resonate with Hare Krishna in this poem, Pages (first stanza),

Leaf by leaf through the pages of life,

 searching for that something amiss,

 longing for the eluding bliss…

 through the maze of childhood

 into the amazing youth…

 

And takes us to stanza 4,

 

Love, hate and disgust bubbling out

 through the pores of sanity

 that remained unchanged but entrapped

 in life-long charade

 leading my way to the mystic;

 the strange and the unknown;

 unfelt all these years

 I dwelled, drudged and drained…

 leaf by leaf through the pages of life…

(Mydavolu Venkatasesha Sathyanarayana‎ to Literary Love,June 7, 2017, Face Book)

Mahathi is the author’s pen name. His true name is Mydavolu Venkatasesha Sathyanarayana. Dr.Madagula Nagaphani Sarma says in the ASHEERVABINANDANALU that the author adopted the pen name perhaps for a reason, in that the name “MAHATHI is the VEENA of divine sage NARADA.” (p viii)

And Evans Terence Mantyk, President and Co-Founder of the Society of Classical Poets, writes in the FOREWORD of Hare Krishna,

To write a book-length ballad is no small feat. Since Samuel Coleridge’s seminal Romantic work Rime of the Ancient Mariner was published in 1978, only a handful of poets have attempted a ballad this prodigious.

It appears evidentiary that Hare Krishna by author Mahathi is the most voluminous ballad poetry book in the last two centuries, in consideration of the following,

1798 – Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel T. Coleridge; lyrical ballads by William

             Wordsworth;

1897 – The Ballad of Reading Gaol by Oscar Wilde;

1911 – Ballad of the White Horse by G.K. Chesterson;

2013 –  The Ballad of Radheya by K.R. Sharanya

(MAHATHI) https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/hare-krishna-about-my-latest-book/

Indian ballad poets of the last two centuries, to include Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), Sarojini Naidu (1879-1949) and Jaishankar Prasad (1890-1937) are not given consideration here relative to their volume collection of poems.

If we can dare to concur that Mahathi’s gem stones of ballad poems in Hare Krishna ascribe him to be “a poet of enviable literary supremacy” (see back cover comments), let us randomly enjoy the bansuri so rich in aesthetics, metaphors, pun and satire for good entertainment.

Take a look at the initial poem, dedicated to LORD SRI KRISHNA VAASUDEVA, titled PRAYER AND DEDICATION (first stanza, p xxiv)

OM

I scrawl ‘Hare Krishna, Krishna’;

my quill as Ram impels!

When sure can quell all sin; my ink,

Why other tales I tell?

A warm, pleasant dedication to Lord Krishna, reciting the Krishna mantra. Lord Krishna can quell all sins. Imagery and satire, using ‘my ink’ to tell more tales.

And the first poem, AVATAR, (stanza 1, 4, p 1),

The two dumb torches glowing in vain

in grim silence of jail…

gloomy, gloomy… who harkens there

a mother’s painful wail?

 

Vasudeva, Vasudeva,

O’ shackled father’s love

helpless to help thy wife art thou

or save thy child art thou!

Beautiful beginning! Beautiful setting, full of drama. AVATAR symbol of God Vishnu incarnated as Lord Krishna on Earth.  And mother Devaki in child-birth pain with her eighth child. Father Vasudeva in panic mode how to save this new-born child.

Continuing AVATAR, (stanza 32, 33, p 6),

It’s new, all new experience;

his own city looked strange,

with rare unknown beauties, and world

as entered virgin age.

 

It’s Krishna Ashtami, the eighth

diem from full Moon day

of Sravana month. Oh the night

was dim, chilly and gay.

 

Continuing AVATAR, (stanza 63, 65, p 12)

For once he kissed the child

and tenderly placed

beside his wife, sighed, peeked around

with feelings interlaced.

 

Hare Rama, Hare Rama,

Rama, Rama, Hare, Hare,

Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna,

Krishna, Krishna, Hare, Hare.

Here Vasudeva feeling overjoyed and safe. Something mysterious about to happen. Drama and excitement. And then finally comes the Krishna Mantra, so esoteric, so removal of illusions – All-Attractive, All Pleasure. Beautiful bansuri and drumbeat vibrating a spiritual platform. Transcendental, indeed.

Let us take another random turn to this ballad on LORD BRAHMA (# 18, stanza 1, p 114),

Mysterious are ways of God.

For even Lord Brahma,

Creator-God of life in worlds;

Krishna, an enigma!

Here in this ballad (57 stanzas), author Mahathi aesthetically and rhythmically expresses how Lord Krishna as God-Head incarnated on Earth is able to commandeer Lord Brahma, as creator of the universe, to share Vedic knowledge as the Father of Dharma. As in stanza 37, p 121,

“Created thee Vedas O’ Lord

to lead the human race

through foul mundane rough paths

to gain the sacred grace.”

And I take special note of author Mahathi trans-creation in English in classic Elizabethan style. It is in this genre you will find his literary forte.

And a look at another ballad, KRISHNA ON BHAKTI (stanza 4, p 271),

“Alas they speak of Godliness,

but ask for carnal spree!

These natural human traits can get

from vices never free!”

Bhakti “In Hinduism, it refers to devotion to, and love for, a personal god or a representational god by a devotee.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhakti

Lord Krishna’s concern of “human traits” in the collage of human carnal knowledge begs the question of freeing ourselves from such attachment. Author Mahathi explodes in this ballad our attainment of bhakti – true devotion to Lord Krishna. Imagery so scintillating.

A significant and interesting observation in this book, Hare Krishna is that the author, Mahathi has ended each beautiful ballad with the KRISHNA MANTRA – the 16 word GREAT MANTRA of opulent omniscience …The mantra is a spiritual call to the Lord, meaning, “Oh energy of the Lord, please engage me in the loving service of Lord Krishna.”

http://www.harekrishnajapa.com/archives/1118

Mahathi was born on June 12, 1958 in Nelore, Andhra Pradesh, India. He first practiced law as an advocate in Nelore, and then joined the Government of India as a Superintendent of Salt at Nelore. His quilted literary journey began in his late 20’s – early 30’s, while pursuing academic studies and graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree, and later a Masters of Law degree. His first best poem, Housemaid’s Daughter copped the Editor’s pick (www.enchantingverses.com). This was followed by a First Prize win for his poem, Farewell in the P4 Poetry Competition (www.p4poetry.com).  He has four published anthologies of poetry and narratives viz (1) Golden Lotus (2) Plastic Faces and Other Poems (3) Wheels and (4) JUST HUMAN, Be They on Love, Nature, Beauty or Burning Social Issues. Book reviews include, Watching You, A Collection of Tetractys Poems by Leonard Dabydeen (2012); Searching For You, A Collection of Tetractys and Fibonacci Poems by Leonard Dabydeen (2015). Mahathi’s 6th book, Finding the Mother, is a trans-creation in English of H.H. Sage Valmiki’s Sri Sundara Kanda, the 5th Canto of Srimad Ramayana – best acclaimed as an all time classic of English literature. He is also a member of the World Renaissance for Classical Poetry under the guidance of Dr.H. Tulsi. And  now Mahathi brings us this book, Hare Krishna, a trans-creation in English of the “eternal Indian epic, SRIMAD BHAGAVATHAM by H.H. Sage SRIKRISHNA DWAIPAYANA VYASA” – revelling Mahathi as “one of the best Indian English poets of the 21st century.”

Here is a book that you will find lavishly entertaining as it reels out the mystical and spiritual episodic childhood  of Lord Krishna in beautiful ballads. The book is available here:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/hare-krishna/id1220419132?ls=1&mt=11

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/hare-krishna-mahathi/1126058529?ean=2940157362904

https://www.overdrive.com/media/3232132/hare-krishna

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/hare-krishna-1

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Mahathi_Hare_Krishna?id=AEiIDgAAQBAJ

http://www.ebooks2go.com/Hare%20Krishna

July 19, 2017

 

MAHATHI BK REV PNG

Author: Mahathi

Book: Hare Krishna

Publisher: Prowess Publishing, May 2, 2017

Pages (Print Length) Paperback 402 pages

ASIN B071VDC76Y

ISBN  978 161 813 284

Kindle Ed. ₹ 321

Paperback  ₹ 450

 

Book Review: Leonard Dabydeen

Bhagavad Gita Verse 7, Chapter 4

Whenever there is a decline in righteousness, and a rise in unrighteousness prevails, then do I manifest myself, O Bhaarata.

Bhagavad Gita Verse 7, Chapter 4

Mahathi’s 8th book, Hare Krishna is an empowering tour-de-force of the glorious and adventurous saga of Lord Krishna’s childhood in mellifluous versification, inked in prosody of bansuri-like narrative and lyrical ballads. The book is a trans-creation in English by Mahathi based on the immortal Hindu classical epic, Srimad Bhagavatham by luminous spiritual H.H.Sage Sri Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa (see back cover of the book). It is the arduous arrival from Mahahi’s 6th book, FINDING THE MOTHER, another trans-creation in English verse reflective of SRI SUNDARA  KANDA, H.H. Valmiki’s 5th Canto of SRIMAD RAMAYANA and well-recognised as an immortal classic of English Literature.

Author Mahathi’s prodigious Hare Krishna is staged as another English literary classic, prodding his literary esteem as “arguably one of the best English poets of the 21st century.” (see back cover of the book). It is set as ballads in iambic meter in 47 dramatic narrative and lyrical poems, with inclusive conundrums offering insightful explanations on critical religious topics related to Lord Krishna and Hinduism to flag 402 pages.

In order to appreciate, understand and absorb with relentless joy the childhood adventures of Lord Krishna as in this author’s book, Hare Krishna, it would be incumbent in body, mind and spiritual upliftment to quest for Lord Krishna. From Wikipedia, the free Encyclopedia,

“Krishna (/ˈkrɪʃnə/; Sanskrit: कृष्ण, Kṛṣṇa in IAST, pronounced [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] (About this sound listen)) is the god of compassion, tenderness, and love in Hinduism.[1][2] He is one of the most widely revered and popular Indian divinities, worshipped as the eighth incarnation of the Hindu god Vishnu and also as the supreme God in his own right.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krishna

In his blog, ThoughtCo.com, Subhamoy Das explains,

“As one of the principal gods of Hinduism, Krishna represents mankind’s aspiration to embody all that is divine. Amorous and loyal, he is seen as the ideal husband, and his playful nature is a gentle admonition to remain good-natured in the face of life’s challenges.

As counsel to the warrior Arjuna, Krishna serves as a moral compass for the faithful. His exploits in the Bhagavad Gita and other holy scripture are ethical models of behavior for Hindus, particularly on the nature of personal choice and responsibility to others.”

https://www.thoughtco.com/the-story-of-the-birth-of-lord-krishna-1770453

According to IndiaNetzone, the illustrious and spiritually glorifying childhood of Lord Krishna, being enshrined in the Krishna charitas, with Krishna blessed as the eighth incarnation of God Vishnu, is a significant part of the Indian epic Mahabharata. In the first three paragraphs, under the title: Childhood of Lord Krishna, Indian Classical Tale, Mahabharata,

The mischief and miracles by Lord Krishna in his infant days are still revered and remembered by the Indians as the holy antics by the Vishnu avatara in Gokula with the Braj people.

After the birth of Lord Krishna, his father Vasudeva brought him to Gokula. He was brought up in the safe and secured supervision of mother Yashoda and Nand. The maternal uncle of Lord Krishna, King Kansa was destined to die in his hands and thus the king wanted to kill Krishna right from his birth. During his childhood, Krishna faced several perilous situations that were designed by the notorious Kansa, however no one could slay him for his unsurpassed divine power.

There were great rejoicings and celebration in Gokula after the Braj people came to know about the charming son of Nand and Yashoda. The astrologers predicted that this divine child would kill the demons and the evil, thus he should be called the Lord of the herds and the Gopis. King Kansa somehow came to know that his reason of death lived in Gokula and kept on sending demons to slay all the children of the place.

http://www.indianetzone.com/38/childhood_lord_krishna.htm

And within this eternal swirl of a magnificent worldly amphitheatre, author Mahathi garlanded Lord Krishna’s childhood saga in this book Hare Krishna, in euphonious narrative and lyrical ballads. In offering BLESSINGS to Mahathi, Jai Srimannarayana writes,

Touch His [Lord Krishna] story anywhere. It is sweet. Put it in poetry or prose, and it is sweet. Let anyone sing it or write it, and it is still sweet because the very nature of the Lord is sweet. (p v)

Mahathi’s unequivocal due diligence in the pursuit of writing Hare Krishna, based on the epic classic saga SRIMAD BHAGAVATHAM by H.H. Sage SRIKRISHNA DWAIPAYANA VYASA is sculpted from his undeterred belief that our fractured society and its social ills make us inhuman in a human world. This is Adharma. And only by following “Dharmic path alone can bring eternal peace and prosperity to the world.” (See back cover of the book).

In his own perambulating over this book, Hare Krishna, Mahathi informs us of his inner soul-searching, saying,

2 years of writing, 2 more years of waiting, strenuous research, a lot of prayers, a lot more of penance, pain, joy, tears and divine rhapsody; a little intuition, a shower of invisible benisons from THE MASTER and a never ending influx of blessings from family, friends, relatives and well-wishers…oh at last ready is HARE KRISHNA.

https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/hare-krishna-about-my-latest-book/

In typical vintage poetic affluence garnished in fun, pun and satirical brush-strokes, Mahathi  reaches out to us with deep-throated emotions that resonate with Hare Krishna in this poem, Pages (first stanza),

Leaf by leaf through the pages of life,

 searching for that something amiss,

 longing for the eluding bliss…

 through the maze of childhood

 into the amazing youth…

 

And takes us to stanza 4,

 

Love, hate and disgust bubbling out

 through the pores of sanity

 that remained unchanged but entrapped

 in life-long charade

 leading my way to the mystic;

 the strange and the unknown;

 unfelt all these years

 I dwelled, drudged and drained…

 leaf by leaf through the pages of life…

(Mydavolu Venkatasesha Sathyanarayana‎ to Literary Love,June 7, 2017, Face Book)

Mahathi is the author’s pen name. His true name is Mydavolu Venkatasesha Sathyanarayana. Dr.Madagula Nagaphani Sarma says in the ASHEERVABINANDANALU that the author adopted the pen name perhaps for a reason, in that the name “MAHATHI is the VEENA of divine sage NARADA.” (p viii)

And Evans Terence Mantyk, President and Co-Founder of the Society of Classical Poets, writes in the FOREWORD of Hare Krishna,

To write a book-length ballad is no small feat. Since Samuel Coleridge’s seminal Romantic work Rime of the Ancient Mariner was published in 1978, only a handful of poets have attempted a ballad this prodigious.

It appears evidentiary that Hare Krishna by author Mahathi is the most voluminous ballad poetry book in the last two centuries, in consideration of the following,

1798 – Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel T. Coleridge; lyrical ballads by William

             Wordsworth;

1897 – The Ballad of Reading Gaol by Oscar Wilde;

1911 – Ballad of the White Horse by G.K. Chesterson;

2013 –  The Ballad of Radheya by K.R. Sharanya

(MAHATHI) https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/hare-krishna-about-my-latest-book/

Indian ballad poets of the last two centuries, to include Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), Sarojini Naidu (1879-1949) and Jaishankar Prasad (1890-1937) are not given consideration here relative to their volume collection of poems.

If we can dare to concur that Mahathi’s gem stones of ballad poems in Hare Krishna ascribe him to be “a poet of enviable literary supremacy” (see back cover comments), let us randomly enjoy the bansuri so rich in aesthetics, metaphors, pun and satire for good entertainment.

Take a look at the initial poem, dedicated to LORD SRI KRISHNA VAASUDEVA, titled PRAYER AND DEDICATION (first stanza, p xxiv)

OM

I scrawl ‘Hare Krishna, Krishna’;

my quill as Ram impels!

When sure can quell all sin; my ink,

Why other tales I tell?

A warm, pleasant dedication to Lord Krishna, reciting the Krishna mantra. Lord Krishna can quell all sins. Imagery and satire, using ‘my ink’ to tell more tales.

And the first poem, AVATAR, (stanza 1, 4, p 1),

The two dumb torches glowing in vain

in grim silence of jail…

gloomy, gloomy… who harkens there

a mother’s painful wail?

 

Vasudeva, Vasudeva,

O’ shackled father’s love

helpless to help thy wife art thou

or save thy child art thou!

Beautiful beginning! Beautiful setting, full of drama. AVATAR symbol of God Vishnu incarnated as Lord Krishna on Earth.  And mother Devaki in child-birth pain with her eighth child. Father Vasudeva in panic mode how to save this new-born child.

Continuing AVATAR, (stanza 32, 33, p 6),

It’s new, all new experience;

his own city looked strange,

with rare unknown beauties, and world

as entered virgin age.

 

It’s Krishna Ashtami, the eighth

diem from full Moon day

of Sravana month. Oh the night

was dim, chilly and gay.

 

Continuing AVATAR, (stanza 63, 65, p 12)

For once he kissed the child

and tenderly placed

beside his wife, sighed, peeked around

with feelings interlaced.

 

Hare Rama, Hare Rama,

Rama, Rama, Hare, Hare,

Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna,

Krishna, Krishna, Hare, Hare.

Here Vasudeva feeling overjoyed and safe. Something mysterious about to happen. Drama and excitement. And then finally comes the Krishna Mantra, so esoteric, so removal of illusions – All-Attractive, All Pleasure. Beautiful bansuri and drumbeat vibrating a spiritual platform. Transcendental, indeed.

Let us take another random turn to this ballad on LORD BRAHMA (# 18, stanza 1, p 114),

Mysterious are ways of God.

For even Lord Brahma,

Creator-God of life in worlds;

Krishna, an enigma!

Here in this ballad (57 stanzas), author Mahathi aesthetically and rhythmically expresses how Lord Krishna as God-Head incarnated on Earth is able to commandeer Lord Brahma, as creator of the universe, to share Vedic knowledge as the Father of Dharma. As in stanza 37, p 121,

“Created thee Vedas O’ Lord

to lead the human race

through foul mundane rough paths

to gain the sacred grace.”

And I take special note of author Mahathi trans-creation in English in classic Elizabethan style. It is in this genre you will find his literary forte.

And a look at another ballad, KRISHNA ON BHAKTI (stanza 4, p 271),

“Alas they speak of Godliness,

but ask for carnal spree!

These natural human traits can get

from vices never free!”

Bhakti “In Hinduism, it refers to devotion to, and love for, a personal god or a representational god by a devotee.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhakti

Lord Krishna’s concern of “human traits” in the collage of human carnal knowledge begs the question of freeing ourselves from such attachment. Author Mahathi explodes in this ballad our attainment of bhakti – true devotion to Lord Krishna. Imagery so scintillating.

A significant and interesting observation in this book, Hare Krishna is that the author, Mahathi has ended each beautiful ballad with the KRISHNA MANTRA – the 16 word GREAT MANTRA of opulent omniscience …The mantra is a spiritual call to the Lord, meaning, “Oh energy of the Lord, please engage me in the loving service of Lord Krishna.”

http://www.harekrishnajapa.com/archives/1118

Mahathi was born on June 12, 1958 in Nelore, Andhra Pradesh, India. He first practiced law as an advocate in Nelore, and then joined the Government of India as a Superintendent of Salt at Nelore. His quilted literary journey began in his late 20’s – early 30’s, while pursuing academic studies and graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree, and later a Masters of Law degree. His first best poem, Housemaid’s Daughter copped the Editor’s pick (www.enchantingverses.com). This was followed by a First Prize win for his poem, Farewell in the P4 Poetry Competition (www.p4poetry.com).  He has four published anthologies of poetry and narratives viz (1) Golden Lotus (2) Plastic Faces and Other Poems (3) Wheels and (4) JUST HUMAN, Be They on Love, Nature, Beauty or Burning Social Issues. Book reviews include, Watching You, A Collection of Tetractys Poems by Leonard Dabydeen (2012); Searching For You, A Collection of Tetractys and Fibonacci Poems by Leonard Dabydeen (2015). Mahathi’s 6th book, Finding the Mother, is a trans-creation in English of H.H. Sage Valmiki’s Sri Sundara Kanda, the 5th Canto of Srimad Ramayana – best acclaimed as an all time classic of English literature. He is also a member of the World Renaissance for Classical Poetry under the guidance of Dr.H. Tulsi. And  now Mahathi brings us this book, Hare Krishna, a trans-creation in English of the “eternal Indian epic, SRIMAD BHAGAVATHAM by H.H. Sage SRIKRISHNA DWAIPAYANA VYASA” – revelling Mahathi as “one of the best Indian English poets of the 21st century.”

Here is a book that you will find lavishly entertaining as it reels out the mystical and spiritual episodic childhood  of Lord Krishna in beautiful ballads. The book is available here:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/hare-krishna/id1220419132?ls=1&mt=11

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/hare-krishna-mahathi/1126058529?ean=2940157362904

https://www.overdrive.com/media/3232132/hare-krishna

https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/hare-krishna-1

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Mahathi_Hare_Krishna?id=AEiIDgAAQBAJ

http://www.ebooks2go.com/Hare%20Krishna